Triskaidekaphilia, or 13 Reasons Why 2013 Might Rule

1. 2013 is the 1st year to occur since the world was supposed to end on Dec. 21, 2012, and the 14th year to occur since the world was supposed to end on Y2K, and if you subtract the value of the latter clause from the former you get: 14 – 1 = 13. And we’re still alive!

 

2. 2013 is the 1st year since 1432 (that’s 581 years ago!) in which the numerals can be rearranged to create a countable sequence of natural numbers.

—> 1432 —> 1234
—> 2013 —> 0123

 

3. 2013 ends with a baker’s dozen, which is 1 better than a standard dozen (especially in an actual bakery when you’re buying cupcakes or donuts . . . or bottles of wine).

 

4. 2013 is the 1st of only 5 remaining years in the 21st century to end with a Fibonacci Number:

—> 2013, 2021, 2034, 2055, 2089

 

5. 2013 is considered a “baby-makin’ number” by The Onion.

 

TRISKAIDEKAPHILIA

 

6. 2013 contains 2x Friday the 13ths: Sept. 13 and Dec. 13.

 

7. 2013 is the 1st of only 3 years that will occur within the next 1,000 years that ends with a Wilson Prime Number:

—> 2013, 2563, 3005

 

8. 2013 is the 1st year since 1987 that has 4 different numerals.

 

9. 2013 translated into binary code contains 12 different 1s, and so the sum of this binary value plus occurrences of said value is 13:

—> 0110010 0110000 0110001 0110011

 

10. 2013 is the 1st of only 8 years between now and 3013 that ends with an emirp, which is a prime number that remains a prime number when its numerals are flip-flopped.

—> 2013, 2017, 2031, 2037, 2071, 2073, 2079, 2097

 

11. 2013 will only have 12 full moons, ironically, rather than the more common 13 full moons, which occur during 63% of calendar years. However, one of these full moons is also a true blue moon in the original sense of the word, defined by the Maine Farmers’ Almanac as “the third full moon in a season that has four full moons” between equinox and solstice, NOT the 2nd full moon within a calendar month, as is now commonly accepted. So, if a legitimate blue moon in accordance with the original definition counts as double, then: 12 + 1 = 13. This one’s a stretch, I know, but still sorta cool.

 

12. 2013 ends with a happy number, which means that if the squares of its individual digits are added together, and then this procedure is repeated for the new sum, then the recursive reiteration of this process will eventually equal 1 rather than loop endlessly:

—> 1² + 3² = 10
—> 1² + 0² = 1

 

13. 2013 is considered lucky by the Chinese, the Ancient Egyptians, members of the Colgate University community (like me), and other triskaidekaphiles.

 

The image above, entitled “Triskaidekaphilia” was lifted from James Murphy.

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Posted in Current Events, Mathematics, Triskaidekaphilia
One comment on “Triskaidekaphilia, or 13 Reasons Why 2013 Might Rule
  1. […] the other hand, if you’re a triskadekaphiliac, well, that’s a whole ‘nuther story. Lots of cool things with 2013 in store. The […]

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